Posts tagged TEDxTalks

The impact of desegregation on learning: Rucker Johnson

tedx:

“Denying children access to resources damages both their educational and later life outcomes.”

As schools were desegregated in the 1950s and 1960s, opponents feared that embracing students from low-performing all-black schools would lower standards and unfairly disrupt white students’ performances. In fact, as Rucker Johnson shows with his extensive research, desegregation had essentially no effect on white students, but propelled minority students to unprecedented levels of success. (Filmed at TEDxMiamiUniversity)

Each week, we choose four of our favorite talks, highlighting just a few of the enlightening speakers from the TEDx community, and its diverse constellation of ideas worth spreading. Browse all TEDxTalks here »

TEDx Playlist: 9 incredible musical performances by kids

tedx:

TEDxAmericanRiviera, Photo by Carolyn Newstrom

You don’t have to be a grown-up to wow an audience — and these very musical kids prove it. From a 12-year-old guitar player to the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra’s Academy of Peace Through Art, we’re sure you’ll enjoy these 9 musical performances fueled by raw talent and hard work.

TEDxYouth@Madrid - Andrea Motis & Joan Chamorro Trio

Take your eyes off the screen for a moment and you’ll be sure to believe you’re listening to a vocalist with decades of musical experience. But Andrea Motis is only 15 years old. With her stunning voice and brass talent, she stuns the TEDxMadrid crowd with the American standards, “Our Love Is Here to Stay,” “Slightly Out of Tune,” and “Please Don’t Talk About Me When I’m Gone.”

When it Comes to Music, it’s All About the Feel : Ray Goren at TEDxOrangeCoast

Ray Goren started playing guitar four years ago. He was 8. Now, he spends his time beguiling music critics and amazing crowds nationwide. At TEDxOrangeCoast, he showcases his remarkable talent.

Read More

Be unpopular: Erika Napoletano

tedx:

“When are you going to admit that there is something glorious about being you?”

With the help of her unique sense of humor, Erika Napoletano shows that it’s ok to embrace - and not apologize for — the things that make us human. (Filmed at TEDxBoulder.)

Each week, we choose four of our favorite talks, highlighting just a few of the enlightening speakers from the TEDx community, and its diverse constellation of ideas worth spreading. Browse all TEDxTalks here »

10 TEDxTalks every American should watch before Election Day

tedx:

With Americans electing their president tomorrow, we revisit our playlist from last week—10 TEDxTalks every American should watch before voting:

tedx:

As a New York Times article put it this morning, “The presidential campaign entered a delicate phase on Tuesday, suddenly becoming a sideshow to the hurricane.” In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, it’s hard to remember that in just a week, Americans will be heading to the polls and, with their presidential selection, answering big questions about the future of the economy, education and their country’s place in this world.

In these 10 TEDxTalks, a global selection of speakers suggest altogether new ways of looking at these questions.

More banks, fewer problems: Scott Shay at TEDxWallStreet

Scott Shay is a small banker with a big idea: No more big banks. The way he sees it, the bigger they are, the harder they fall and the bigger the global disaster they can leave in their wake. At TEDxWallStreet, he appeals for a massive break-up — spreading out the risk, diversifying the field, lowering the dependency, and creating a more secure financial system overall. 

Be optimistic about the US and China: Geoffrey Garrett at TEDxSydney

Americans are unsure what the future of China means for them. Many are apprehensive about it’s policies and even fearful of the competition escalating into a perilous rivalry. Geoffrey Garrett thinks the US-China relationship is better than ever. At TEDxSydney, he outlines a vision of the future where codependent superpowers can peaceably exist.

A new Sudan: Tarig Hilal at TEDxKhartoum

A fresh start: From the Revolutionary war to westward migration and the history of immigration — it’s an idea emblazoned onto the American psyche. Now, nations across Africa and the Middle East are looking for new ways to start over for themselves. In this powerful talk from TEDxKhartoum, Tarig Hilal tells the story of a hopeful generation of Sudanese that are coming to terms with their past and setting a new direction for their country’s future. A story that can remind Americans what it means to be start from scratch.

Read More

Good germs make healthy buildings: Jessica Green

tedx:

“The uncharted territory here is thinking about microbes in a new way…”

Microscopic organisms permeate our bodies and our buildings. While some of these microbes are detrimental to our health, others keep us alive. Jessica Green believes that we’re designing buildings to keep microbes out — regardless of whether they’re good or bad — and calls for a new breed of “interior groundskeepers.” (Filmed at TEDxPortland.)

Each week, we choose four of our favorite talks, highlighting just a few of the enlightening speakers from the TEDx community, and its diverse constellation of ideas worth spreading. Browse all TEDxTalks here »

TEDx playlist: 6 talks that became phenomena

tedx:

From the TED Blog’s week-long celebration of TEDx:

More than 20,000 TEDxTalks have been given at 5,000+ events held in 137 countries around the globe. With the mass scale of the program, it’s a little unpredictable which talks will gain a steady following of fans on the TEDxTalks website and YouTube channel, and which talks will skyrocket into public consciousness practically overnight. Below, six TEDxTalks that became phenomena and had ripple effects their speakers hardly could have anticipated.

Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability
Brené Brown has inspired millions to embrace their vulnerability, with one of the most forthright and deeply personal presentations ever featured on TED. When Brown first gave her talk at TEDxHouston, she had no idea that — just two years later — nearly 5 million people would have watched it. “I call 2010 the year of the vulnerability talk and 2011 the year of walking the talk, because I was very unprepared,” Brown told the TED Blog before the posting of her second talk, “Listening to shame” at TED2012.

Thomas Suarez: A 12-year-old app developer
At TEDxManhattanBeach in 2011, Thomas Suarez showed the world what growing up digital can do to kids: turn them into engineers. When he gave his talk, Suarez had already developed a widely circulated iPhone whack-a-mole app called “Bustin Jeiber,” and had started tutoring other kids to become developers too. His talk has made more than a million TED viewers feel excessively guilty about what they were doing at age 12.

Larry Smith: Why you will fail to have a great career
Few can tell it like it is quite the way Larry Smith can. This extremely popular talk, given at TEDxUW in 2011, holds an outlandish paradox: Smith’s observations about your future are pessimistic and his tone nearly apoplectic, and yet he leaves you feeling richly inspired to take control of your life’s path. More than 1.2 million people have enjoyed this talk as a result.

Joe Smith: How to use a paper towel
Most people probably assumed they knew how to use a paper towel before Joe Smith gave a talk on the subject at TEDxConcordiaUPortland. But with the simplest of choreography — shake and fold — he transformed how millions of people dry their hands. It’s easy to spot those who have seen Smith’s talk by the way they leave a public bathroom, and TED staffers are happy to see his technique spreading rapidly.

Dan Meyer: Math class needs a makeover
Dan Meyer is evangelist for making math fun. By sharing his methods for engaging students with real problem solving at TEDxNYED, his talk has pushed forward a radical shift in the way we educate our kids. Nearly a million people have seen the talk so far — many of them teachers — kick starting something of a math revolution.

Ami Klin: A new way to diagnose autism
It doesn’t always take a million views for a TEDxTalk to make an impact. Perhaps by coincidence, just four months after we posted Ami Klin’s talk from TEDxPeachtree about his urgent research into early childhood autism, the NIH granted his team $8.3 million to create a new Autism Center of Excellence — one of only three in the United States.

TEDx playlist: 14 amazing physical feats

tedx:

From the TED Blog’s week-long celebration of TEDx:


Not all TEDx presenters speak in the traditional sense of the word.
Many sing, dance, contort and do dazzling acrobatics. Since the TEDx program’s launch in 2009, we have seen some spectacular physical performances curated by local organizers. As we celebrate TEDx’s 5,000th event and 20,000th talk we felt it was only right to highlight some of the best for you in a playlist.


A human video game: Siro-A at TEDxTokyo
This performance art group uses their bodies and light projections on cubes and screens to glorious end, in what feels more like a music video than a talk.

Acrobatic leapfrog: Stunt Double Circus at TEDxYouthOttawa
How much height can one get from a pogo stick? Acrobats Joey Albert, Paul Perreault, Fred Gryzbowski and Nick McClintock show us.

A ballet of chimes: Scapino Ballet at TEDxRotterdam
This dance is music to the ears. As the dancers sway, their chime belts add another dimension.

Read More

tedx:

From the TED Blog’s week-long celebration of TEDx:
X certainly marks the spot.The TEDx program was launched in 2009 to bring the mission of spreading ideas to the local level, with independent organizers curating their own events for their own communities. This week, the program is celebrating many milestones. Not only did yesterday mark the 5,000th TEDx event — this week also brings the 20,000th TEDxTalk.
So which of these many talks has proved the most popular? From baby geniuses and an 11-year-old food activist to the secret of living to 100, we have counted our views from TED.com and Youtube to bring you our 20 most-watched TEDx talks to date.
Simon Sinek on how great leaders inspire action (filmed at TEDxPugetSound in 2009): 7,579,005 views
Brené Brown discusses the power of vulnerability (filmed at TEDxHouston in 2010): 7,029,330 views
Shawn Achor gives us the happy secret to better work (filmed at TEDxBloomington in 2011): 3,152,254 views
Thomas Suarez is a 12-year-old app developer (filmed at TEDxManhattanBeach in 2011): 3,053,261 views
Jane Fonda on life’s third act (filmed at TEDxWomen in 2011): 2,090,958 views
Louie Schwartzberg has three words: Nature. Beauty. Gratitude. (filmed at TEDxSF in 2011): 1,680,383 views
Jason Fried asks why work doesn’t happen at work (filmed at TEDxMidWest in 2010): 1,671,347 views
Larry Smith delivers why you will fail to have a great career (filmed at TEDxUW in 2011): 1,614,299 views
Joe Smith reveals how to use a paper towel (filmed at TEDxConcordiaUPortland in 2012): 1,585,879 views
Birke Baehr is 11 and knows what’s wrong with our food system (filmed at TEDxNextGenerationAsheville in 2010): 1,544,537 views
Neil Pasricha on the 3 A’s of awesome (filmed at TEDxToronto in 2010): 1,455,980 views
Nigel Marsh tells us how to make work-life balance work (filmed at TEDxSydney in 2010): 1,403,385 views
Charlie Todd on the shared experience of absurdity (filmed at TEDxBloomington in 2011): 1,384,172 views
Luis von Ahn and massive on-scale collaboration (filmed at TEDxCMU in 2011): 1,242,599 views
Dan Meyer says math class needs a makeover (filmed at TEDxNYED in 2010): 1,161,857 views
Amy Purdy on living beyond limits (filmed at TEDxOrangeCoast in 2011): 1,113,388 views
Dan Buettner uncovers how to live to be 100+ (filmed at TEDxTC in 2009): 1,102,431 views
Erez Lieberman Aiden, Jean-Baptiste Michel and what we learned from 5 million books (filmed at TEDxBoston in 2011): 1,088,771 views
Patricia Kuhl shares the linguistic genius of babies (filmed at TEDxRainier in 2010): 1,049,003 views
Michael Norton knows how to buy happiness (filmed at TEDxCambridge in 2011): 997,798 views
Written by Shirin Samimi-Moore

tedx:

From the TED Blog’s week-long celebration of TEDx:

X certainly marks the spot.

The TEDx program was launched in 2009 to bring the mission of spreading ideas to the local level, with independent organizers curating their own events for their own communities. This week, the program is celebrating many milestones. Not only did yesterday mark the 5,000th TEDx event — this week also brings the 20,000th TEDxTalk.

So which of these many talks has proved the most popular? From baby geniuses and an 11-year-old food activist to the secret of living to 100, we have counted our views from TED.com and Youtube to bring you our 20 most-watched TEDx talks to date.

  1. Simon Sinek on how great leaders inspire action (filmed at TEDxPugetSound in 2009):
    7,579,005 views
  2. Brené Brown discusses the power of vulnerability (filmed at TEDxHouston in 2010):
    7,029,330 views
  3. Shawn Achor gives us the happy secret to better work (filmed at TEDxBloomington in 2011):
    3,152,254 views
  4. Thomas Suarez is a 12-year-old app developer (filmed at TEDxManhattanBeach in 2011):
    3,053,261 views
  5. Jane Fonda on life’s third act (filmed at TEDxWomen in 2011):
    2,090,958 views
  6. Louie Schwartzberg has three words: Nature. Beauty. Gratitude. (filmed at TEDxSF in 2011):
    1,680,383 views
  7. Jason Fried asks why work doesn’t happen at work (filmed at TEDxMidWest in 2010):
    1,671,347 views
  8. Larry Smith delivers why you will fail to have a great career (filmed at TEDxUW in 2011):
    1,614,299 views
  9. Joe Smith reveals how to use a paper towel (filmed at TEDxConcordiaUPortland in 2012):
    1,585,879 views
  10. Birke Baehr is 11 and knows what’s wrong with our food system (filmed at TEDxNextGenerationAsheville in 2010): 1,544,537 views
  11. Neil Pasricha on the 3 A’s of awesome (filmed at TEDxToronto in 2010):
    1,455,980 views
  12. Nigel Marsh tells us how to make work-life balance work (filmed at TEDxSydney in 2010):
    1,403,385 views
  13. Charlie Todd on the shared experience of absurdity (filmed at TEDxBloomington in 2011):
    1,384,172 views
  14. Luis von Ahn and massive on-scale collaboration (filmed at TEDxCMU in 2011):
    1,242,599 views
  15. Dan Meyer says math class needs a makeover (filmed at TEDxNYED in 2010):
    1,161,857 views
  16. Amy Purdy on living beyond limits (filmed at TEDxOrangeCoast in 2011):
    1,113,388 views
  17. Dan Buettner uncovers how to live to be 100+ (filmed at TEDxTC in 2009):
    1,102,431 views
  18. Erez Lieberman Aiden, Jean-Baptiste Michel and what we learned from 5 million books (filmed at TEDxBoston in 2011): 1,088,771 views
  19. Patricia Kuhl shares the linguistic genius of babies (filmed at TEDxRainier in 2010):
    1,049,003 views
  20. Michael Norton knows how to buy happiness (filmed at TEDxCambridge in 2011):
    997,798 views

Written by Shirin Samimi-Moore

tedx:

Neurologist Kelly Foote and neurosurgeon Michael Okun research direct brain stimulation — strategically implanting electrodes inside the skulls of their patients to alleviate symptoms of disease. In their talk at TEDxUF, they tell the story of one of their patients, whose obsessive-compulsive disorder was taking over her life: 

“…Let me tell you a story of [one of our patients] that will blow your mind: this young woman from Davenport, Iowa, who has the same disease that Howard Hughes died of, called obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD. She’s obsessed with fears of being contaminated. Everything out there is dirty to her, and she’s paralyzed by these fears. 
She won’t touch anything, and, in fact, when she came to see us for the first time she wouldn’t sit down in our psychiatrist’s office for her first interview…
She’s had obsessive-compulsive disorder for a long time, but when she got pregnant, her symptoms got a lot worse. And of course everybody said, you know, “It’s the hormones. I’m sure when you give birth to the baby everything will be okay.” Well, it wasn’t. It got a lot worse.
And then, two years later, Child Protective Services is threatening to take her two-year-old daughter away, because she can’t stop washing her. Her baby is red and scaly and tender.
Now, here is the cruel thing about obsessive-compulsive disorder. These people have insight. She knows that she’s hurting her baby. She knows that her obsessions are irrational. She knows that she’s driving away the people that love her. And she has no power to stop these behaviors. She’s desperate—and she’s tried everything…she’s taken all the medications; she’s been through in-patient behavioral therapy programs. Nothing’s working. 
She heard about our research and she contacted us, and we implanted two deep brain stimulators in her brain in the area that we thought would be likely to help quiet these obsessive thoughts that have been plaguing her. And to make a long story short…it worked—and it was pretty damned excited to us.
Now, I have to say, that at one point she did call me in a panic. She said, “Dr. Foote, something is terribly wrong. My deep brain stimulators have stopped working because I was at the movie theater last night and I was walking across the floor and it was really sticky and I was completely grossed out.” And I calmed her down and I said, “Whoa, whoa, whoa, wait a minute—number one—you were at the movie theater last night—and number two—that really grosses me out too. I think you’re going to be okay.”
So, to me, the most intriguing thing about this case is that we’re moving beyond using deep brain stimulation to treat movement disorders like Parkinson’s disorder and tremor—which now we know we can do—and it looks like we’re going to be able to address malfunctioning other circuits in the brain—like limbic circuitry that cause problems like depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.”

tedx:

Neurologist Kelly Foote and neurosurgeon Michael Okun research direct brain stimulation — strategically implanting electrodes inside the skulls of their patients to alleviate symptoms of disease. In their talk at TEDxUF, they tell the story of one of their patients, whose obsessive-compulsive disorder was taking over her life:

“…Let me tell you a story of [one of our patients] that will blow your mind: this young woman from Davenport, Iowa, who has the same disease that Howard Hughes died of, called obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD. She’s obsessed with fears of being contaminated. Everything out there is dirty to her, and she’s paralyzed by these fears.

She won’t touch anything, and, in fact, when she came to see us for the first time she wouldn’t sit down in our psychiatrist’s office for her first interview…

She’s had obsessive-compulsive disorder for a long time, but when she got pregnant, her symptoms got a lot worse. And of course everybody said, you know, “It’s the hormones. I’m sure when you give birth to the baby everything will be okay.” Well, it wasn’t. It got a lot worse.

And then, two years later, Child Protective Services is threatening to take her two-year-old daughter away, because she can’t stop washing her. Her baby is red and scaly and tender.

Now, here is the cruel thing about obsessive-compulsive disorder. These people have insight. She knows that she’s hurting her baby. She knows that her obsessions are irrational. She knows that she’s driving away the people that love her. And she has no power to stop these behaviors. She’s desperate—and she’s tried everything…she’s taken all the medications; she’s been through in-patient behavioral therapy programs. Nothing’s working.

She heard about our research and she contacted us, and we implanted two deep brain stimulators in her brain in the area that we thought would be likely to help quiet these obsessive thoughts that have been plaguing her. And to make a long story short…it worked—and it was pretty damned excited to us.

Now, I have to say, that at one point she did call me in a panic. She said, “Dr. Foote, something is terribly wrong. My deep brain stimulators have stopped working because I was at the movie theater last night and I was walking across the floor and it was really sticky and I was completely grossed out.” And I calmed her down and I said, “Whoa, whoa, whoa, wait a minute—number one—you were at the movie theater last night—and number two—that really grosses me out too. I think you’re going to be okay.”

So, to me, the most intriguing thing about this case is that we’re moving beyond using deep brain stimulation to treat movement disorders like Parkinson’s disorder and tremor—which now we know we can do—and it looks like we’re going to be able to address malfunctioning other circuits in the brain—like limbic circuitry that cause problems like depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.”

Mars: our (once) watery neighbor?

tedx:


NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover—and its tracks.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Read more here.

With the Mars Curiosity rover roving all over the Red Planet (and sending off some very entertaining tweets as it does), it seems appropriate to revisit astrophysicist Maria Sundin’s talk at TEDxUniversityofGothenburg on water, and its importance to our planet—as well as others.

From the talk:

“Looking at our neighbor, Mars—It is today a cold, dry desert planet. It’s smaller than the earth. But during the time that life arose on Earth—originated here—Mars was very different. It had a huge ocean on the northern hemisphere; it had an atmosphere.

If we talk about life in the universe, people usually want a big spaceship landing right outside there so we can, you know, try to communicate…but I would almost be just as intrigued if I found a dead bacteria or something very small and lifelike on Mars because that could give us the key to whether life originates if you have a place where the conditions are favorable.

The reason why Mars has changed so much is that it’s smaller than the earth. The lesser gravity means that Mars has been unable to keep its atmosphere, so it’s very low pressure on the surface. If you were to pour out a glass of water on the surface of Mars, it would just evaporate instantly.

But there has been lots of water there …so, just imagine this old neighbor planet—it has had oceans; it has had rivers; it’s been a very different world. So worlds can change.”